Farm Wedding and Reception Venue at Franny’s Farm

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Ceremony 20
Ceremony 5
Bridesmaids 9
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This fun-loving, 33-acre organic farm offers flexible venue space to suit your needs. The barn features an event space on the ground level and a custom designed farm house on the upper level. Lodging options include the 3 bedroom farm house and an off-grid, eco-community center with cabins and unlimited camping. Franny’s Farm has gardens, pond, and huge firepit and is home to chickens, turkeys, sheep, goats, pig and donkey! Feel far away from the hustle and bustle, but remain conveniently close to amenities since you are only 10 miles from downtown Asheville.
Indoor Facilities: Rustic, chic barn with bar you can stock for your event. Accommodates up to 85 guests, up to 200 with added tent.
Outdoor Facilities: Garden ceremony site for up to 150, an intimate setting on the dock by pond for 50 guests or our new “Woods Wedding” site for up to 100 .

See more about our listing at 

Borrowed and Blue

Romantic Asheville

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for voting us one of the favorite farms to visit

 

Check us out in Mountain Xpress !

Thank you for voting Franny’s Farm one of the “Favorite Farms to Visit” in Western North Carolina.

We appreciate your support! Stay tuned for all the fall fun happenings!  Get on out here & get down for BARNAROO on Sept 30-Oct 2. 

With Gratitude! ~Franny, Jeff, Zach, Karissa & all the furry & feathered friends on the farm!

Ten Things to Have at Your Farm Wedding

 

1. Photobooth – Having photos is one of the best parts of remembering your wedding so why not set up a chic photobooth for your guests to have fun with. Everyone will remember those moments for years to come.

2. Decorations – Check out Pinterest for all the creative and affordable ways to get the look you want. Event rental companies provide rustic, shabby-chic supplies to enhance your wedding decor.

3. Bonfire – A bonfire is a beautiful addition to a farm wedding. When the party starts to wind down, what better way to transition into the evening than with a S’mores bar and hanging out by the fire under the stars.

4. Comfort – With an outdoor wedding consider the following to help everyone be comfortable: transportation for handicap and elderly, covers for hay bales and seating and water, refreshments and appetizers while guests are waiting for the ceremony.

5. Bathrooms – Not all Farms have public access bathrooms so be sure to set aside a budget for bathroom rentals, your guests will thank you.

6. Shoes – Heels are best reserved for other settings than a farm. Arrange a basket of flip flops for your guests so they can dance the night away in comfort.

7. Dancing – Kicking up your heels is a great way to celebrate at your farm reception.  Arrange music for the ceremony, first dance, cake-cutting and reception to ensure the flow of the event in the right direction. Create a playlist for the DJ or get a live band to play your reception. Picking the right music can make a good party.  

8. Wedding Photos – Part of the fun about your big day is taking photos with the wedding party. Make sure to get pictures with anything and everything you can on the farm. From hay bales to barnyard animals, pictures will give you some fun memories and capture those moments forever.  

9. Favors – From sweets to soaps, candles to fans, seeds to custom mason jars there are so many creative ideas for favors to thank your guests for coming to celebrate your union. 

10. Bug Repellant – Outdoor Weddings are a picturesque and memorable setting to get hitched, but one thing is for certain. There will be bugs. It is always good to offer bug spray to guests or have other repellant methods ready for you big day.
 

Franny’s Farm- Organic Certification and NON-GMO

Franny’s Farm is so close to eligibility for organic certification. We are challenged daily with managing our farm organically.  But, it’s the hopes for an abundant crop, good weather, our dedicated supporters sticking with us through the growing pains and expanding the organic market that keeps us motivated. Farming is a highly speculative occupation and we are optimistic and grateful to be in such a supportive community as Asheville. April Fools Day, 2016 marks our 3 year anniversary on Franny’s Farm and meeting our eligibility for organic certification. It’s been three years of record-keeping and the process will take more than over-night to complete. We’ve come along way and there is more to come! We’ve got some REALLY big news to release in the next few weeks so stay tuned to our website  where you can also find information about eco-cabins, camping and venue rental for weddings and private events. Daily pictures and information can be found on our facebook page ,​ Twitterand Instagram

We are all geared up for a productive farming season and want you to know that we have always been dedicated to growing organic although we do not make those claims on our labeling yet. We even feed our furry and feathered friends on the farm all NON-GMO. Please read on to get the top line on what is organic and GM/GE. This is a deep rabbit hole but knowing basic definitions and how to decifer their meaning is helpful.

Why is organic important? Organic is NON-GMO. Under federal organic standards, GMOs are prohibited in organic production. As a consumer, you can rely on organic labeled foods to be NON-GMO. Today, genetic engineering is rampant throughout the entire food chain. The U.S. produces the following GMO crops: alfalfa, canola, corn, cotton, papaya, soy, sugar beets, zucchini and summer squash. A Consumer Reports survey from October 2014 tested more than 80 packaged products containing soy an corn ingredients GMOs. Nearly ALL products without any labeling claims had GMO content. Most products with “natural” claims contained GMOs and NONE of the certified organic products tested contained GMOs.

What makes a crop genetically engineered? The Codex definitions sets international food standards and defines genetic engineerins as the applications of 1. injection of DNA from one organism into another including 2. other lab-based methods known broadly as cell fusion. This uses various techniques such as electrical currents and exposing cells to chemicals to produce hybrids. There is a lot of controversy surrounding genetically engineered crops. Our policy makers need to hear issues from consumers, businesses and farmers. You know the ole’ saying, “Your are what you eat.” Invest in your own education, human and environmental health. 

Tickets are almost sold out! Come on out to Lamb Jam and plan to be amazed by the food that awarded chefs from the eastern region will be preparring. Enjoy the opportunity to hear and meet Meredith Leigh, author of “The Ethical Meat Handbook”. Tickets are available through the Blind Pig of Asheville.

Peace, Love & Prosperty to you from Franny’s Farm, “the bowl of heaven”.

Farmer Franny- February- time to Start Seeds indoors

When it’s cold outside, get your greens growing inside……… 

February is the month to start your seeds indoors!  You can get a 1-2 month jump by starting seeds inside.  It’a easy and can be done in your kitchen and it is a budget friendly option that allows you to grow many varieties not available at your big box store. Besides, it’s nice to have green things growing again!

We have some amazing local garden shops in Asheville like Sow True Seeds, Fifth Season Garden Supply and LOTUS that already have seeds in. Planting native and non-GMO are a great way to go!

Jan/beginning of Feb in our Zone 6 garden- plant outdoors in 10-12 weeks  (*Truth be told, the ONLY time I’ve been successful with organic brassicas (like broccoli and cauliflower) has been when starting them indoors and planting early)

• Artichokes • Broccoli  • Cabbage
• Celery • Endive  • Escarole
• Kale • Mache

Mid-February in our Zone 6 garden- plant in 8-10 weeks

• Chamomile • Chives • Eggplant
• Lavender • Rosemary & Tyme
• Leeks • Lovage • Parsley
• Peppers • Tomatoes

Farmer Franny’s Tips & Tricks:

Use sterile seed starting mix, pots and containers.You can make your own seed starting mix with peat moss, compost, and vermiculite. Just be sure to heat the compost to at least 150 degrees to kill any pathogens before using to start seeds.

Place the seeds in the starter mix in the pots and wet thoroughly from the bottom (watering from the top can dislodge seeds).Water from the bottom wicks the moisture up under the seedlings. I put my seed starts in a plastic tray with a clear plastic lid in a sunny window. Keep moist, but not wet, and with the clear cover on until seedling emerges. Once seedling emerges, remove the clear lid.

Make sure you label your seedlings as soon as you plant them; you may think you will remember 2 months from now, but likely not.

Now is also a great time to start keeping a journal- tracking what you planted, what worked well , what didn’t work so well 

Your seedling’s first leaves are not “true” leaves; think of them as baby teeth. The second sets of leaves are their true leaves. They are ready to be hardened off when they have their first set of true leaves.

Seedlings must be hardened and not just thrown outside. You take them out a little at a time, gradually increasing their exposure to sun and cold, only during the daytime. I try and plant when there is a warm spell forecasted to minimize the shock.

Have Fun! No worries! There are plenty of stores to use as a back up if your first seed starting adventure goes a little awry………..

To Grow Something, Is to Have Faith in the Future